Clean My Code: 5 Tips to Make Your Code Cleaner

“How do I clean my code?” You may have this thought after completing your code for the first time. However, if you don’t think about this, you definitely should. It is very important to clean your code if you would like to be a successful programmer. In the sample that you will see below, our expert will explain to you how to clean your code in simple steps.

Firstly, we should provide you with information about the author who gives you the tips that you are going to get acquainted with. Assignment.EssayShark looks for talented experts that are ready to share their knowledge and experience with students. One of our experts has completed useful tips on coding so you no longer have to ask, “How do I clean my code?” All of our experts possess higher academic degrees and all of them are very experienced. Therefore, you have the ability to receive advice from a person who is knowledgeable in theory and also has practical experience.

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If you need to know how to clean your code, look at our sample without hesitation. If you have some questions about our service or about the samples, you can contact us anytime!

Check the input data

Note this code snippet:

public void Draw(Figure figure)
{
  if (figure != null) {
     Console.WriteLine("Draw " + figure.ToString());
  } else {
     throw new ArgumentNullException("figure");
  }
}

Now we need to read the entire code to the end to get to the line where the exception is thrown if the function argument is null. However, it would be better to check the input data in the first place. This facilitates an understanding of how this method should be used for people who will read this code after you. So let’s change the order of comparison operators:

public void Draw(Figure figure)
{
  if (figure == null) {
     throw new ArgumentNullException("figure");
  } else {
     Console.WriteLine("Draw " + figure.ToString());
  }
}

Now you can immediately determine which argument is valid for transfer in this method, and you do not need to view all of the code up to the end to understand it.

You do not always need an else statement

Continuing with the code from the previous example, if the shape argument is equal to null, an exception is thrown, and then the remainder of the method definitely will not be executed. Therefore, there is no point in adding else, which adds padding to the majority of the code. This code looks cleaner:

public void Draw(Figure figure)
{
  if (figure == null) {
     throw new ArgumentNullException("figure");
  }
  Console.WriteLine("Draw " + figure.ToString());
}

Note that the code after the if statement does not have any padding.

Braces

This item is totally subjective. Some developers like braces, others do not. There is no single opinion on how to do the right thing. You must decide for yourself. Let’s remove the braces in this example, and see how it looks:

public void Draw(Figure figure)
{
  if (figure == null)
     throw new ArgumentNullException("figure");
  Console.WriteLine("Drawing " + figure.ToString());
  Console.WriteLine("---");
}

Now the code has become cleaner. What do you think about this?

Pay attention to the identifiers names

The names of identifiers in your code are as important as how you name your children. Nobody wants to read other people’s code with such identifiers:

  • od: What is the meaning of “od”?
  • Button1 Click (): What kind of Button1? And how is it different from Button2?
  • thisAs: What is this?

Use names that will be able to transmit your ideas into code without distortion.

Avoid unnecessary variables

In the 1980’s, a book on programming taught us to declare a variable for any reason. Look at this piece of code that reads two numbers from the console and displays the maximum of them:

var Input1 = Console.ReadLine();
var Number1 = Convert.ToInt32(Input1);
var Input2 = Console.Readline();
var Number2 = Convert.ToInt32(Input2);
var max = (Number1 > Number2) ? Number1 : Number2;
Console.WriteLine(max);

The main purpose of this code is to find the maximum of two numbers. Therefore, Input1 and Input2, which are strings to the read user input, are not useful or necessary in this code. All we need is two numbers. The temporary line that we receive from the console in the process is not important. Therefore, these two variables do not improve the code in terms of readability, but only add unnecessary noise. We can assume the input from the console and convert it into the number in one line of code:

var Number1 = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
var Number2 = Convert.ToInt32(Console.Readline());
var max = (Number1 > Number2) ? Number1 : Number2;
Console.WriteLine(max);

In general, avoid announcements of unnecessary variables. Use variables to improve the readability of the code.

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